Friday, 4 January 2013

Celebrate your place in South Australia’s history



There are many places around Australia that allow you to record in some way your descendants name in a public monument.  The Maritime Museum in Sydney has the Welcome wall, and Adelaide has Settlement Square at the Migration Museum. 

Recently my mother purchased a paver with my maternal grandparents name and year of arrival in Australia stamped on it.  My grandparents were both cremated with their ashes scattered.  There is no place to lay flowers, no place I can see their names, until now.    
Whether your family has always been here, came as early colonists or are recent arrivals, there’s a place for you in the Migration Museum’s Settlement Square. The pavers that form a striking ‘Tree of Life’ pattern in Settlement Square are engraved with the names, places of origin and dates of arrival of thousands of South Australian immigrants. Settlement Square and its companion database of information about the families thus recorded is a testament to the rich cultural diversity of South Australia.

The money that you purchase the brick with goes into the Migration Museum Foundation. A tax-exempt incorporated association which was set up in 2000. The Foundation exists as a membership-based fund to support the Museum’s programs through interest raised on the principal amount that is invested.

A great way to honour your ancestors and support a fantastic museum.

Other Lithuanians who appear in the square are;
Tadas Zurauskas  1948
Kostas Teodoras Tymukas 1948
Pulgis & Maria Andrusevicius 1949
Vaclovas Miliauskas 1948
Vaclovas & Susanna Germanas Lithuania and Germany 1950
Bronius Vitkunas (Brian Newman) 1947.
You can find out more about Settlement square at http://migration.historysa.com.au/foundation 

1 comment:

Migration Museum said...

Google alerts failed us Daina - I've only just seen this! Thanks for writing such a lovely post about Settlement Square. It's humbling to know how special the site has become for so many people, and a privilege to hear everyone's stories.

Catherine
Curator, Migration Museum